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Nigerians React to British Man Now Nigerian ( he married a nigerian ) first-time visit to Nigeria !

Adam Webb
Adam Webb, Visited and travelled around Nigeria, married into a Nigerian family. Updated Mar 25

I visited Nigeria for my wife’s brother’s wedding a few years ago and there was so much that I didn’t expect. Here are just a few things.

  1. People are really friendly. This is not just an offhand nicety, but everyone was genuinely nice to me as a stranger, greeting and offering help.
  2. There ARE scams, but people don’t want you to fall for them. Nigeria is famous for it’s scams (419s) and before visiting you are made aware that it is a big deal, but for every scam I saw, there were 10 people that warned me about them beforehand. It seems the majority of people are embarrassed by them but have come to terms with them being part of life.
  3. Everyone is invited to a party. If you know about a party, just turn up! It is not expected that you know the people hosting, but is expected that you can just go along if you know somebody.
  4. Weddings are huge. Hundreds, even thousands of guests. Invites don’t seem to be a thing and again, anyone it appears can attend. Even people walking past on the street can just join in and be fed!
  5. The rich are super, mega rich and the poor are very very poor. Some of the most expensive real estate in the world is in Lagos, with skyscrapers and plush hotels. But there are also so many people that live in squalor spitting distance away.
  6. Nigerians LOVE the English Premier league. You will see busses and trucks painted in Arsenal, Manchester United, Chelsea etc. colours everywhere and bars are packed out when there is live English football on.
  7. Busses often have preachers and/or sales people get on and loudly evangelise or sell their products. Even at 6am in the morning.
  8. Christians and Muslims live together and interact together quite happily. The only people that have any issues (from my experience) are Athiests, which are treated like they have an illness.
  9. Petrol is often a massive problem. As a foreigner you are aware that Nigeria is a big oil producing nation, but there are so many petrol shortages and sometimes many-mile-long queues at petrol stations, which change their prices accordingly, that you wouldn’t believe it.
  10. Lots of buildings have ‘THIS BUILDING IS NOT FOR SALE’ written on them, as apparently a popular scam is to ‘sell’ somebody elses building without their knowledge!
  11. Most busses don’t have a schedule, they leave when they are full, which can take hours. Also, what might seem like a buss station, with lots of the smaller busses touting for passengers, often isn’t. I remember being aboard a minibus that bolted off at high speed along with the 40 or 50 others that were in the same place the moment they heard a police siren!
  12. Customer service is appalling in almost all restaurants and shops (aside perhaps from the super-high-end ones and weirdly KFC). It is not unusual to have to wake somebody to serve you, there is never any hurry to help you and there seems to be no pride in doing a good job. I know this sounds harsh, but this point is absolutely accurate from my experience. It appears in response, a culture of the customer becoming rude, loud and clicking fingers etc. to get service has emerged. I was always nice and polite, but rarely had the same granted back to me by the person I was paying.

These are just a few of the things I remembered, but I had a fantastic time there and will certainly be returning many times in the future. I certainly recommend you see for yourselves and don’t just believe the negative hype.

Abi Balogun
Jeff Verkouille

Jeff Verkouille

Nailed it pretty well. Did you get used to the pepper? Some seriously spicy food here.

That is very true. It was almost a game of the families that cooked for me to try to make me sweat! However I was brought up with hot Mexican and Indian food so was quite enjoying their challenge

Frances Onuoha: I really enjoyed reading this piece.

Jeff Verkouille

You will never regret travelling. Always do so with an open mind and respect for people and you will be a better person for it. I wish you the best of luck.

Olutosin Denuga

Olutosin Denuga

As a Nigerian, I have on several occasions found myself in wrong destinations while visiting Lagos because apparently, what I heard was different from what was being called. We non-Lagosians are usually either afraid to visit Lagos or awed like foreigners on our first visit, Lagos is like a different country on its own. The people (angry by default) and animals are weird! Many of us try as much as possible to avoid anything that would make us visit Lagos but admire the city from a distance .

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Ope Katakata

Ope Katakata

True, I live in lagos now but before I moved here after my first degree, I was painted a picture of super-rowdy, rough city and compared to the cities I have lived in before now, Lagos is rowdy, noisy and expensive but also full of opportunities and energy. I wish I could live in another part of Nigeria and work in Lagos.

Ugo Ugo

Ugo Ugo

Lol ‘….angry by default….’ I can relate to this. I live in Lagos!

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Donatus

Donatus

I will encourage you to visit Abuja when next you are in Nigeria Adam. you will be more amazed! We can protect foreigners ourselves without the police, offer you a drink in parties with our last penny.

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Adam Webb

I did visit Abuja, and it was very very different from everywhere else I was in the country. Wide open roads with not much traffic, new looking buildings with well tended guardents and of course Aso Rock. It feld cleaner too, but not quite as vibrant as Lagos!

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Salis Michael: You did really enjoyed your Nigeria visit. As a neutral, in comparison with the two cities, which…
Israel Ogolo

Israel Ogolo

Mar 27 · 2 start an online business selling our premium domains on dotifi.com s including Adam Webb

I enjoyed reading this. It left a smile on my face. Have you visited my city: Port Harcourt? If you haven’t, do give it a try when next you’re visiting the country. I’ll like to see the impression it has on you. All the same, nice job and kudos to you. Cheers!

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Stephen Oladunjoye

Stephen Oladunjoye

Interesting

Michael Ijoba Joseph

Michael Ijoba Joseph

WOW!! welldone sir

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Emmanuella Okorie

Emmanuella Okorie

Your description is perfect, so perfect I can’t stop smiling.

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Jeff Verkouille

May 19 · 8 start an online business selling our premium domains on dotifi.com s

Yes. I’ve always liked spicy food and my Naija wife cooks Yoruba hot, although she’s Idoma/Bsa Ige herself.

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Shojobi Ifeoluwa: Lol…how sweet!

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Monica Patty

Jul 18, 2018 · 48 start an online business selling our premium domains on dotifi.com s including Adam Webb

Nice one and you really got the vibe. Many Westerners don’t get to venture away from the Lekki/Victoria Island enclave but it seems you did. That was why you could be in the bus that you described.

I would have loved it more to read about your experience with the language, if any – Pigin English. …

(more)

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Adam Webb

Original Author · Jul 30, 2018 · 57 start an online business selling our premium domains on dotifi.com s

I loved the way people spoke, and found it a lot easier to understand than I thought I would. Except perhaps figuring out what the destinations of the small busses was from what was being shouted by the person hanging off it!

And as for the ‘sound of Naija’, I absolutely loved it!

People in Nigeria seem to love to party, and really go for it. Everybody dances, and it seems like nobody is too shy to join in. Afrobeat (and of course anything by Fela) just makes the best party music and is so happy and joyous. And the new chart stuff is sneaking its way into the UK charts these days.

I only saw Lekki and Victoria Island for a day. I feel like this is where the rich westerners do like to stay, having heard scare stories of kidnappings or scams or whatever. But I am far from rich and certainly more adventurous than most and travelled far and wide. I never felt threatened (except perhaps by police at roadblocks) and people are just so nice!

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Happiness Ekanem

Sep 3, 2018 · 15 start an online business selling our premium domains on dotifi.com s including Adam Webb

you’ve said it all, am a Nigerian and there’s absolutely no lie in all you’ve said. Sooner or later, am gonna travel out of my Country to experience life outside my country so I can relate to others just like you have.

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Adam Webb

Original Author · Nov 22, 2018 · 12 up

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